CLARK, GENE - NO OTHER LP

CLARK, GENE - NO OTHER LP

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The long-awaited reissue of Gene Clark's 1974 masterpiece No Other - one of the American singer-songwriter and Byrds founding member’s finest works.

The original tapes have been remastered at Abbey Road, a stunning 5.1 surround mix of this album created for the first time and all the studio tapes have been forensically worked on and mixed by the duo of Gene Clark aficionado Sid Griffin and John Wood, the producer famed for his work with the likes of Nick Drake, Fairport Convention and Sandy Denny. More than just bonus material, these tracks have not been edited or composited in any way, allowing for everything to be heard exactly as it went down in the studio and before any overdubbing took place.

Coming on the eve of Gene’s 75th birthday, this reissue serves as both a celebration for fans and an introduction to soon-to-be fans. There really is no other like No Other.


On February 16th, on the heels of the smashing success of Teens of Denial, Car Seat Headrest will release a new version of Twin Fantasy. “It was never a finished work,” Will says, “and it wasn’t until last year that I figured out how to finish it.” He has, now, the benefit of a bigger budget, a full band in fine form, and endless time to tinker.  According to him, it took eight months of mixing just to get the drums right. But this is no shallow second take, sanitized in studio and scrubbed of feeling. This is the album he always wanted to make. It sounds the way he always wanted it to sound.

It’s been hard, stepping into the shoes of his teenage self, walking back to painful places. There are lyrics he wouldn’t write again, an especially sad song he regards as an albatross. But even as he carries the weight of that younger, wounded Will, he moves forward. He grows. He revises, gently, the songs we love so much. In the album’s final moments, in those apologies to future me’s and you’s, there is more forgiveness than fury.

This, Will says, is the most vital difference between the old and the new: he no longer sees his own story as a tragedy.